Two Nights

Written by Kathy Reichs

Review written by John Parker

John Parker is a Graduate-qualified English/Spanish Teacher, owner and director of CHAT ENGLISH, an English Language Centre in Avilés on the north coast of Spain . A voracious reader, he has particularly loved horror fiction for many years.


Two Nights
Penguin Random House
RRP: £20
Released: June 29 2017
HBK

In the latest book by Kathy Reichs, we are introduced to a character with the unlikely name of Sunday Night. Sunny is a woman with problems. An ex-policewoman, who once had a great career ahead of her, is now a recluse. A highly-decorated career has now been left behind after an incident which left a man dead and Sunny permanently scarred, physically and, perhaps, mentally. So she takes on a job as a private detective. Having done a stint in the army, Sunday Night is a woman who can look after herself, which turns out to be just as well in this adventure.

So, in what may be the first of many adventures for her, Sunny is hired to find a girl who has been missing for a year. She gets the contract through her mentor and foster-father, Beau and sets off to meet Opaline Drucker, the grandmother of the missing girl, Stella. It turns out that Stella’s mother and brother were both killed in a bomb explosion while Stella disappeared, possibly kidnapped by the bombers. Sunny, for some reason empathises with Stella and takes the job more for some hidden personal reason than for the excellent remuneration on offer from Opaline Drucker. Soon, Sunny finds herself in a dangerous place and has to call on her brother, Gus, for some help. Things begin to get even more complicated and perilous. Will they both survive?

Reichs’ novel is quite different from the Temperance Brennan novels though she uses a technique which we saw in “Speaking in Bones” where the chapters are interspersed with interludes in which we see things from the point of view of an unidentified person. However, this adds to the mystery and the payoff is worth it. Sunday Night takes a bit of getting used to. She seems rather unapproachable and full of self-pity at first but gradually we learn about her motivations and what makes her tick.  Reichs’ fans will love her, I am sure. I certainly enjoyed the ride and will be pleased if Sunny and Gus make a return appearance.  



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